Firebacks

Shape: quasi-rectangular

17 results

  1. 1046

    lewes,_sussex arch soc 108.jpg
    795 x 440 mm

    Description: Sub-rectangular shape; twisted rope edging (top and sides); two crosses between two saltires, all formed of straight lengths of twisted rope and irregularly arranged.

    Notes: A poorly cast, and probably early, fireback. Formerly part of the J. H. Every collection.

    Manufactured: in the early to mid 16th century in the Weald area of England.

    Current location: Anne of Cleves House, Southover High Street, Lewes, East Sussex, England.

    Museum number: LH000.917 (part of the Sussex Archaeological Society museum group)

  2. 1047

    lewes,_sussex arch soc 109.jpg
    1090 x 602 mm

    Description: Sub-rectangular shape, no edging; three impressions formed of a dagger (c.350mm) with fleur-de-lys terminals: two, at each end, with the handle uppermost, the other inverted lower right of centre.

    Notes: The dagger (length approx. 39cm) can be described as a 'cross-hilt' or 'quillon' type, possibly of German origin (ex. inf. Tobias Capwell). The grouping of three daggers may also have apotropaic significance in relation to the Trinity. Formerly part of the J. H. Every collection.

    Manufactured: in the 16th century in the Weald area of England.

    Current location: Anne of Cleves House, Southover High Street, Lewes, East Sussex, England.

    Museum number: LH000.920 (part of the Sussex Archaeological Society museum group)

  3. 469

    lloyd_004.jpg
    ~817 x ~393 mm

    Description: Quasi-rectangular; edging formed of repeated bordered strip with undulating vine with fruit and leaves; horizontal line of two uneavenly repeated vine strips dividing the plate into two compartments, the upper comprising a grape bunch repeated eighteen times, the lower comprising a bird (probably a swan, a Lancastrian badge), its head turned to its left and one visible wing displayed and inverted, repeated five times with a grape bunch repeated twelve times at the ends and between each swan on the top and bottom of the compartment.

    Notes: The vine strip, swan and grape bunch stamps feature on many firebacks indicating a common source. Illustration from Lloyd, 1925.

    Manufactured: in the mid to late 16th century possibly at Pounsley Furnace, Framfield in the Weald area of England.

    Current location:.

    Citation: Lloyd, N., 1925, 'Domestic Ironwork I', Architectural Review, 58, pp. 58-67.

  4. 519

    penshurst_10.jpg
    850 x 655 mm

    Description: Rectangular; Ionic pilasters at sides, architrave on top; English Stuart royal shield, garter, crown, motto and supporters; date below and either side of garter.

    Notes: One of several firebacks, all of the same date, but varying in size, framing style and moulding; all have stylistic features in common and will have been the work of the same pattern maker, who was also responsible for carving royal coats of arms in three West Country churches. A plaster cast of a fireback of this design is displayed as the royal arms in St George's church, near Abergele in north Wales.

    Copies of this fireback are known.

    Inscription: HONI SOIT QVI MAL Y PENSE / 16 18 / DIEV ET MON DROIT

    Arms: English Stuart royal (James I)

    Manufactured: in 1618 possibly in the Forest of Dean area of England.

    Current location: Penshurst Place, Penshurst, Kent, England.

    Citation: Hodgkinson, J. S., 2010, British Cast-Iron Firebacks of the 16th to Mid-18th Centuries (Crawley, Hodgers Books).

    Citation: Hodgkinson, J. S., 2017, 'Church Armorials and Firebacks: Evidence of an Early 17th-Century Woodcarver', Transactions of the Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society, 135, pp. 213-223.

  5. 587

    plaxtol,_tree house.jpg
    1070 x 615 mm

    Description: Quasi-rectangular; grooved dowel edging (top and sides); four impressions of a rondel dagger (c.330mm) saltirewise between two dowel crosses; two vertical lengths of dowel in line along right edge.

    Notes: Rondel daggers were common in the 15th and 16th century. Grooved lengths of dowel are to be seen on other firebacks suggesting a common source. The arrangement of the daggers (each approx. 35cm long) in a saltire may also have apotropaic significance.

    Manufactured: in the mid 16th century in the Weald area of England.

    Current location: in private hands, Plaxtol, Kent, England.

    Citation: Easton, T. & Hodgkinson, J. S., 2013, 'Apotropaic Symbols on Cast-Iron Firebacks', Jnl. of the Antique Metalware Soc., 21, pp. 14-33.

    Citation: Hodgkinson, J. S., 2010, British Cast-Iron Firebacks of the 16th to Mid-18th Centuries (Crawley, Hodgers Books).

  6. 661

    rolvenden,_hole park 05.jpg
    >930 x 620 mm

    Description: Fragment; quasi-rectangular; twisted rope edging (top and sides), cavetto edging at bottom; originally, probably a symmetrical arrangement comprising a central, crude crowned, Tudor royal shield, with a standing human figure, its right arm bent at the elbow and its left arm crossing its waist, repeated in upper and lower positions on each side of the shield; to left and right, a twisted rope length repeated in the form of a cross, with the human figure placed above each transverse end and another below the cross and towards the shield; in the bottom corner(s), a (left) hand print.

    Notes: The same crowned shield and use of hand print can be seen on a fireback at Etchingham, indicating a common source.

    Arms: Tudor royal

    Manufactured: in the early to mid 16th century in the Weald area.

    Current location: Hole Park, Rolvenden, Kent, England.

    Citation: Hodgkinson, J. S., 2010, British Cast-Iron Firebacks of the 16th to Mid-18th Centuries (Crawley, Hodgers Books).

  7. 728

    va_03.jpg
    1140 x 610 mm

    Description: Quasi-rectangular; twisted rope edging (top and sides); across the centre, three crosses formed of the repeated stamping of a length of twisted rope.

    Notes: The edging appears to have been formed of the same length of rope. The crosses almost certainly have Christian significance.

    Manufactured: in the 16th century possibly in the Weald area of England.

    Current location: Victoria & Albert Museum, Cromwell Road, Kensington & Chelsea, Greater London, England.

    Museum number: 887.1901 (part of the Victoria & Albert Museum museum group)